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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
accused of plotting a terror attack on u.s. soil. a live report coming up. >>> nasa struggling to find its footing after retiring the shuttle program. we'll take a look at a new study suggesting that underfunding could threaten america's future in space. >> all three engines up and burning. two, one, zero and lift-off, the finalist off of atlantis on the shoulders of the space shuttle. america will continue the dream. jon: that was the final space shuttle launch july 8th, 2011 signaling the end of an era for nasa. federal funding for the space agency has fallen flat. it has come under constant threats of more cuts in recent years. a new study suggests that underfunding and lack of focus could lead to nasa's demise. despite the mars rover curiosity and president's calls for manned missions to mars, nasa appears to be losing its edge in space exploration? we have tom jones, four times former shuttle as snow naught for nasa and planetary scientist. what do you think of nasa's problems? at this point there are no plans to return humans to space until 2020, is that right, tom? >> americans are
't. joining us now on the phone retired u.s. air force colonel, current nasa astronauts dr. coleman spent more than 4,000 hours in space aboard the space shuttle columbia on board the international space station, she's done it all. dr. coleman, katie, great to have you here. >> it's nice to be there. >> jamie: what is that anniversary, that date, today, mean to you? >> well, the fact that it's 40 years since apollo 17, in some ways, it seems like such a big number and yet, i think that what we've done in the meantime is just simply amazing and to think back this is the last time that we had people that walked on the moon, whatever we had one of these anniversaries, i call a friend of mine, andy tinken, wrote "a man on the moon", what were they thinking, what was it like for them. what kind of a mission. apparently apollo 17 broke all the records, it was the longest mission and they brought back the most lunar samples and longest time in lunar orbit and simply amazing mission and so, you know, in early december here in 2012 to celebrate 40 years, it makes me really proud of what i do today. >>
their eyes at our demise. nasa scientists tell people not to worry about the myan calendar. "red eye" hit the streets to see if the they are ready for the end of days as the stupid scientists aren't. naked party at my place on the 20th, everyone. >> it is the end of the world as we know it, and all of these people feel fine. let's find out why. >> you are aware of what is happening on december 21st, 2012, yes? >> the myan prediction that the world will end? >> well, i hate to use the word prediction. it is happening. >> i don't think you can predict the end of the world. i am not too much of a believer jie. what part of the myans always being right do you not understand? >> have you been hoarding your goods and bombshelter and lots of unpro -- unprotected sex? >> none of the above. >> i am starting to think you are not taking armageddon seriously enough. >> i like to live on the edge. i think i can handle it. >> here is why i think it can be an asteroid attack. have you seen "deep impact." >> no. >> we had a black president in that movie too. >> buying all kinds of stuff, and then i will
of this world. right now nasa is revealing the latest discovery on mars. ready in welcome to brand-new hour of "happening now," i'm jon scott. jenna: i'm jenna lee. uncovering new knowledge about the red planet. today's announcement comes nearly four months after the six-wheeled robot landed in a giant crater. nasa unveiling the latest findings today as a gathering of scientists around the world come together. claudia cowen joins us by phone. >> reporter: this would be a game change err but most likely not. this may be a little overhyped after one scientist said that the data would be one for the record books. that was tweeted by curiosity itself through a twitter account run by nasa's jet propulsion lab. for the past few weeks nasa has had to real in expectations issuing a press release saying today's news quote will be the update about the first use of the rove verse full array of analytical instruments to inspect a drift of sandy soil. some say they may have uncovered methane, and that aliens may have been decomposing. the rover is working to identify organic compounds to see if mars can
for lauren. bill: packing his bags in a moment. we'll hear from nasa astronaut scott kelly who is literally about to move into outer space for an entire year. how about that for a road trip? ♪ [singing] martha: the parents of missing college student lauren spiere are saying they are being stonewalled by the friends she was w the people who last saw their daughter. they say they simply are not talking about what happened that night. she vanished last year after a night of partying at her school, indiana university. indiana authorities say they are actively investigating the 20-year-old girl's disappearance but of course the parents want answers as to what happened to their daughter. i'm joined by keith sullivan, a defense attorney, and tamara holder, fox news legal analyst, welcome to both of you. tamara, mrs. spiere's letter is heart wrenching and you can understand why she is frustrated feeling that these people who were with her, because she went back and forth, she went to a bar, she went over to the friends' house and left there alone. one of the boys said he saw her walk across the g
nasa works and so many others have not, my fear, though, we would not have had the same liberty then if we were dealing with the same debt we were today and, yet, you are now compounding it by arguing for more spending. >> the whole discussion around the fiscal cliff is a stimulus program, rather stimulus by further tax cut but a 98 percent or for 100 percent, whether stimulus by extending the payroll --. >>neil: where is the stimulus in extending rates that are already there. >>guest: why, why, why are economists saying we could have a recession without dealing with the cliff live? by taking so much money out of the market by people who would be spending it or by cutting government spending, either by too large an increase in taxes or by too large a cut in government spending, they are saying that would reverse the economic recovery. the whole package was packaged. >>neil: let me ask where we stand now. i wanted to cut to the chase, and whether you think a deal will be done and what it will look like. >>guest: we will do a deal and we will do a deal that week between christmas
on the moon and now nasa is focused on other missions. a look at the private company that is planning the next moon shot. >> i understand that some believe we should attempt a return to the surface of the moon first. as previously planned. i just have to say pretty bluntly here, we have been there before. buzz has been there. >>> bottom of the hour and let's get you caught up on the headlines. dallas cowboys' defensive lineman joshua brent arrested and charged in the death of a teammate, jerry brown, junior. brown was killed in a car crash. police say brent was speeding and driving while intoxicated. >>> a suspect in the deadly terror attack in ben benghazi arrested in egypt. he is the alleged ringleader of an egyptian terrorist net, would. and tomorrower south african president nelson mandela has been admitted to a military hospital. he is undergoing -- undergoing medical tests. they say there is, quote, no cause for alarm. >>> new jobs numbers are out for november. the jobless rate is dropping to 7.7%. that is the lowest rate in four years. sounds good, right? well some analysts say the numb
shots. a nasa scientist recently told a reporter the mars rover has dug up something for the history bks. turns out nasa's history books have exceedingly dull. today, scientists released the results from a first test of the martian soil and no real surprises. the rover found water and some simple carbon moleculars but not the complex carbon that experts consider essential for life. and no sign of aliens. they are probably hiding. one of college football's most prestigious honor could say go to a freshman for the first time. could. the heisman finalists? we have them for you next. but your erectile dysfunction - that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for ily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you can be more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is the only daily ed tablet approved to treat ed and symptoms of bph, like needing to go frequently or urgently. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions and medications, and ask if your heart is healthy enough for sexual activity. do not take cialis if you take nitrates for chest pa
at night. aren't those great? you can thank a brand new nasa satellite that has a special sensor for night viewing. patti ann? >> norah, the north american aerospace defense has been tracking santa every year as he travels around the world for christmas. ever since 1955 without fail. a new children's book shows how important this defense command is to keeping christmas safe. michael keen is the author of the night santa got lost. how norad saved christmas. great to have you here. >> thanks for having me. >> what inspired you to write this book? >> i was embedd in iraq with the 101st air division we were in a town close to the syrian border in 2003. on christmas day the troops got me and dragged me out of bed early and wanted to show me something. dragged me outside flthrough a flood light on and illuminated this 50-foot christmas tree they put up. you can't find a christmas tree in iraq. it showed me the ingenuity and america's spirit of trying to celebrate christmas wherever they are. and the second event was a couple years later i was invited by u.s. air force general duncan mcnabb head
for what was your final mission to the moon 40 years ago today. we'll talk with a former nasa astronaut. >> hippi 2, y hoppity. da-da-da. hippity hopping along. falcon 109. i couldn't have that, bob. it's just too beautiful. [ loud party sounds ] hi, i'm ensure clear... clear, huh? i'm not juice or fancy water. i've gotine grams of protein. that's three times more than me! [ female announcer ] ensure clear. nine grams protein. zero fat. in blueberry/pomegranate and peach. and i'm here to tell homeowners that are 62 and older about a great way to live a better retirement. it's called a reverse mortgage. [ male announcer ] call right now to receive your free dvd and booklet with no obligation. it answers questions like how a reverse mortgage works, how much you qualify for, the ways to receive your money, and more. plus, when you call now, you'll get this magnifier with l.e.d. light absolutely free. when you call the experts at one reverse mortgage today, you'll learn the benefits of a government-insured reverse mortgage. it will eliminate your monthly mortgage payments and give you tax-f
40 years since that historic scene. the final nasa mission sending a man to walk on the moon. last person to do that. he is the commander of a apollo 17 and the last ever made on the moon's surface leaving a special legacy for america's space program. joining us live. captain eugene cernan and last man to walk on the moon. i can't tell you how excited i was to talk to you today. thank you for joining us. >> you are welcome heather. you might have guessed i had no requests for auditions. >> heather: did you plan ahead what you were going sing and what you were going to do? >> no, we didn't. we plan ahead all we're going to from a scientific, but everything else you heard from most of these missions, your reaction to the environment and reaction to things. even things that were said when we left the moon, they come to you because of what you are confronted with. >> heather: explain to us. take us all back there that moment when you first stepped foot on the to the moon surface. what did you see and what did it feel like? >> well, heather, my first step was mine. no matter what a lot
industry who is actually solving something that nasa has completely -- >> that's what i was looking for. the reason magazine angle. >> don't privatize it. just allow people to do what they want to do. >> we will close things out with a post game wrap up with tv's andy levy. >>> time to go back to andy levy for the post game wrap up. what does reason have in common with jerry lewis? >> we will run a telethon next week. i don't know if he will run again in his life, but they are doing an annual thing where we try to have people give us money and we act goofy in front of the cameras. >> excellent. jedediah, do you have a message for greg? >> have i a message for greg because -- i have a message for greg. i am so proud of him. he did a speech at the reagan library. i have been arguing for him to go to college campuses and people need to check it out. he did a good job and i am proud of him. >> we i willed dit that out. >> are you kidded out for the war on christmas? >> i wrote the book and then i stepped backhe
involved in this? i wanted to be an astronaut as a kid. it really did. then i went to nasa and realized i couldn't sit in the capsule. 9 years old i moved on and thought what about business anchor and then i moved on to try to save the world from the fiscal mess as you can see. now you know. >> eric: hello, everybody. i'm eric bolling with andrea tantaros, bob beckel, dana perino, and greg gutfeld. it's 5:00 in new york city. this is "the five." ♪ ♪ brand new details in the murder-suicide of n.f.l. star jovan belcher and cassandra perkins. the kansas city star and the "new york post" report that belcher spent the night drinking and partying with a girl named britney glass, at a popular bar district in downtown kansas city. belcher drove miss glass home, dropped her off and passed out in misbentley. 2:50 a.m., cops woke belcher up and told him not to drive. he called glass apt spent the next four hours in her apartment. at 6:45 a.m., he drove the bentley to his home where girlfriend perkins recently arrived with her own night out with friends. argument ensued and belcher shot perkins n
this. and something that makes you step back, stunning pictures released from nasa looking down on america at night including staten island. we get to see this thanks to the heros who saw it with their own eyes. smie if you have seen -- >>> if you have seen this, that's us. it was captured from space. none of this would even be possible without the heros i just spoke with. as part of the special i am hosting on the 40th anniversary of the last moon walk. ahead of the show's debut this sunday at 9:00 p.m. eastern time on fox newschannel at a time we are looking at patriots going to remarkable heights. >>> the commander of a flight has the power to abort it, right? >> when you launch the commander -- >> liftoff, we have liftoff. >> something starts to go wrong and you are in air we had several modes of abort we could use. just a twist of a handle and we would abort. so we held his hand. we said, huh-uh, dave. you are not going to touch the abort handle. >> 15 seconds. >> we get out of the van and we are the only ones there. i look up and this thing is fully fueled, of course. it i
. scientists want to analyze how the human body reacts to long-term exposure in orbit. this is part of nasa's larger plan to one day send man to mars but the journey, get this, takes eight months one way. so they must understand how the body reacts to those conditions. researchers already know it can affect eyesight. >> we discovered that some crewmembers are having some pressure in their intracain ya'll pressure, pressure in the vain system in their brains and spinal cord especially. that was causing in some crewmembers a vision impact. >> reporter: training for this mission starts early next year with the official launch date in the spring of 2015. jenna. jenna: pretty remarkable. when you think about the story, you wonder why can't we do the fiscal cliff thing? >> reporter: right. jenna: if we can put somebody in space for a year. >> reporter: we need to ask our lawmakers, right. jenna: casey, incredible story. gregg: you can put the man on the moon but you can't --. all right. researchers may have found what could be the earliest known dinosaur to walk the earth. the mysterious fossil f
. it looks even better in hd. they didn't have that 40 years ago, did they. captain gene cernan former nasa astronaut with us now. n her, il by the way is hosting this. traveled all over the country to conduct these interviews. it's great to have you. gene, i just want you to tell our audience, if you can, what you want them to understand about what was done then, four decades ago. >> all right. you know, this -- today, as a matter of fact, bill, is the launch date 40 years ago, and in a week it will be 40 years since those final steps, and what i really want to have happen, we've got almost two full generation, a half of seven tour reef young men and young women in a country today who neither weren't born when neil walked on the moon or diapers or knee pants when i made the last steps. i want to remind them what happened in this country from alan shepard's first steps into space when actually i look them as the first steps on the moon when we didn't even know we were going, and what it took this country, the dead today indication, the commitment of hundreds of thousands of people in this c
at night revealing a planet that is really never in the dark. nasa releasing these pictures that were taken not by me, but by a special satellite called sumy npp. we're about to show you the united states, you can see it coming into frame, and you can see how the lights illuminating from the ground look a lot like the stars and the constellations we see when we look up at night. and here's a bird's eye view of egypt's nile river lit up by boats. yes, those are lights from boats. the reason these images are possible is because of a new sensor that is onboard the camera which stands for the national polar orbiting partnership. it was launched last year. it gives scientists -- and us -- a brand new way to observe what our planet looks like once the sun goes down. what do you think of that, jon? jon: that's cool. and atlanta really stands out in the shot of the sort of, you know, eastern seaboard. i don't know, it's kind of interesting. i was surprised that atlanta is so big and bright. >> reporter: atlanta and, of course, the northeast. and you can see there that sort of corridor up in new yor
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)

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